Adding the Third Dimension to Building Construction Technology in Architecture Education

Authors

  • Rahul Deshpande Associate Professors, Institute of Design Education & Architectural Studies, Nagpur, India
  • Komal Thakur Associate Professors, Institute of Design Education & Architectural Studies, Nagpur, India
  • Tanushri Kamble Assistant Professor, Institute of Design Education & Architectural Studies, Nagpur, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.15415/cs.2015.31005

Keywords:

Information, Facts and Acquaintances, Experimentation and Exploration

Abstract

This paper looks into conventional teaching practices and intends to generate a new approach towards the teaching of Building Construction in architecture schools. With the fast pace of the current world and changing technology, conventional teaching practices that are largely based on information assimilation have ceased to serve us adequately. The rate of change in trends and technologies in the current times do not match the content of our existing syllabus. This paper tries to identify the role and application of Building Construction Technology for training the young minds for handling future challenges and coping up with upcoming developments. It talks about various experimentation and exploration techniques aimed at enhancing the student’s analytical ability as well as his/her understanding of materials, techniques, systems, etc. The Building Construction Technology team at IDEAS has tried to bridge the gap between conventional teaching methods and the changing technology by adding a third dimension to reaching-learning methodology. The paper presents methods devised and tested in the Second Year Building Construction Studio for enabling the students for creative handling of materials and technology.

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References

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Published

2015-07-15

How to Cite

Rahul Deshpande, Komal Thakur, & Tanushri Kamble. (2015). Adding the Third Dimension to Building Construction Technology in Architecture Education. Creative Space, 3(1), 55–68. https://doi.org/10.15415/cs.2015.31005